Architectural Work

Portfolio 1



Fold-Up City

Urban Design Project

Objective. An urban scale renewal project in Queens, New York.

Method. Fold-up City is the vertical projection of the surrounding horizontal city. The vision derives from a grassroots intervention: a complete re-appropriation of the abandoned Queensway railway. The property lines of the city fabric are folded up onto the three-dimensionalized Right of Way to arrive at a new vertical city. This reinterpretation of the Right of Way begins questioning the distinction between private and public space in an urban context. Both sides of the surrounding city fabric are turned into a series of Vertical Blocks that represent the localized area of the site that the structure exists in. Between the two vertical neighborhoods the distinction between private and public becomes blurred. This leads to variations in the typical public space typology. Aspects of ownership have the potential to shift over time allowing Fold-Up City to respond to the publics’ desires.

Year: 2014


Theater Prenestina

Design Project

Objective. A theater along Via Prenestina.

Method. The project intervenes at the head of an upcoming neighborhood called Pigneto along Via Prenestina. Theater Prenestina proposes to activate the street by inserting a wall into a gap in the city fabric. The wall adds density along the street and volumetrically completes the line of high walls along the road. When the theater approaches the overpasses, it bends away in order to look back at the collision of infrastructure floating over the street. The mixed use program will keep the block active during different times of the day and will add a sense that the street has a watchful eye over it. At night the openings will be marked with light which will filter out onto the street level and act as a beacon for the new entrance to the Pigneto neighborhood.

Year: 2013


Meditation Pavilion

Design-Build Project

Objective. Creating a full scale space for meditation.

Method. The Meditation Pavilion is a temporary space created by movable components. The project was sponsored by Cornell Council of Arts and was set up in F.R. Newman Arboretum for the spring. The space is meant for an individual to experience a moment of solitude out in nature. The house is inspired by the introspective qualities of a Japanese Tea House. Light and materiality are major components of the piece.

Year: 2014


Structural Analysis of People’s Meeting Dome

Analysis Project

Objective. Analysis of the People’s Meeting Dome through a 1’:1/2” scale model.

Method. The creation of the model involved an in depth analysis of an existing structure: the dome’s pin joints and several fabrication methods (mainly soldering and 3d milling). The People’s Meeting Dome, designed by Tejlgaard + Jepsen, was set up as an exhibition space to discuss innovative proposals for the future of Danish Housing. The structure is composed of seven different domes that are pieced together. The complexity of the structure can only be truly appreciated when compared to a typical geodesic dome. The People’s Meeting Dome seeks to reinvigorate an idealized geodesic dome through the generation of niches. The pin joints are extremely important to the overall structure because they allow for minimal force to be applied to the struts. Several types of joints are needed because of the corner conditions created through the design.

Year: 2013


Start-Up Campus

Design Project

Objective. A hotel and spa designed for a Ithaca, NY.

Method. The Terrace Hotel is situated on the periphery of a commercial zone in Ithaca, NY. The site is accessible from a terraced level and a lower street level. A main volume connecting each entry point into the site acts as a service volume to the other volumes elevated above ground level. The "arms" or floating volumes hold the private functions: the hotel rooms. Because of the unique site conditions, a three story continuous space allows for each entry to be connected to the lobby space. The spa resides in the upper levels of the service volume. An outdoor terrace with a cantilevering pool overlook the plaza below outside of the restaurant on ground level.

Year: 2013


Terrace Hotel

Design Project:

Objective. A hotel and spa designed for a Ithaca, NY.

Method. The Terrace Hotel is situated on the periphery of a commercial zone in Ithaca, NY. The site is accessible from a terraced level and a lower street level. A main volume connecting each entry point into the site acts as a service volume to the other volumes elevated above ground level. The "arms" or floating volumes hold the private functions: the hotel rooms. Because of the unique site conditions, a three story continuous space allows for each entry to be connected to the lobby space. The spa resides in the upper levels of the service volume. An outdoor terrace with a cantilevering pool overlook the plaza below outside of the restaurant on ground level.

Year: 2012


Owego Town Hall

Design Project:

Objective. A town hall design for a small town in Owego, NY.

Method. The main and subservient volumes form a pinwheel in plan whose center is a vertical tower of circulation. An external public passageway through the site connects the street facade to the riverwalk area. The walkway acts as a series of slices in the overall composition of the building and serves to separate the Owego Town Hall into three main volumes: the meeting hall, the mayor’s office, and the public resource centers.

Year: 2012


Burr Puzzle

Physical Model:

Objective. Reinterpretation of an interlocking puzzle at a different scale.

Method. This project was inspired by wooden burr puzzles from the 18th century. The interlocking pieces were reinterpreted as a joint that could be used at a larger scale such as furniture. The pieces lock together via a series of notches in the wooden beams. The beams appear as if they were originating from a hidden nucleus in the center of the puzzle. Two different types of wood were used (walnut and ash) to emphasize the separation of the different beams and the joining of the materials.

Year: 2012


Drawing as a Model

Conceptual Model:

Objective. A hybrid between model and drawing, a layering of spatial concepts to get a richer experience of the garden.

Method. This device seeks to explain through a series of 2 dimensional planes a complex garden organization. The Japanese pocket garden next to the new Johnson Museum extension translates to a series of images that describe how the garden is viewed and organized. The style of the drawings were inspired by Zen garden masters who illustrated the gardens with mixed vantage points. Unlike most architectural drawings, these paintings were not meant to be read in one direction. There are multiple perspectives and an almost circular reading of space.

Year: 2012


Collage City

Analysis Project:

Objective. Combination drawing of famous plans throughout history.

Method. Colin Rowe, one of the most influential architecture professors in Cornell, developed a new method for analysing urban planning where cities became a series of collaged fragments. This project talks about the urban fabric as a grid that becomes distorted over time until the point where the focus turns from the grid and collection of structures to the individual buildings themselves. There are many famous plans throughout history drawn in the images above. They include: the Guggenheim, Katsura Palace, Sydney Opera House, Bruno Taut’s Glass Pavilion, Palladian Villas, Roman Bath Houses, and many more.

Year: 2012


Design Project

Museum of the Strange:

Objective. Design a museum for the Twilight Zone (a television series in the 60's).

Method. This building is a museum about the Twilight Zone. The form of the building is based on the site; it responds to the views of the city with different arms that extend to the best views and different sized openings at the ends to frame the various urban vistas of Binghamton, NY. Pathways pulled away from the floor plate begin to distort the heights and spatial experience of the space as one travels through the museum.

Mannequins of the different characters are displayed throughout the space. It is a similar concept to Madame Tussad's wax museum with a concentrated focus on the famous characters that made the Twilight Zone so popular. Rod Serling, creator of the Twilight Zone, found inspiration for many of his characters in Binghamton and the museum seeks to reframe the characters within the setting of their conception.

Year: 2011



Design Project

Dowker Knot Pavilion: Extension to the Johnson Museum

Objective. Design a separate pavilion from the preexisting Johnson Museum that focuses on displaying one artist's work (Sol LeWitt).

Method. The Dowker pavilion was generated out of folding a line or programmatic ribbon back in on it-self to form circulation loops. Dowker Knot theory- a branch in mathematics views a knot as the embedding of a circle in three dimensional Euclidean space and then fusing the ends to-gether. I began using these knots as proposals for circulation diagrams and the form evolved concurrently. The inspiration came from the artwork of Sol Lewitt which is showcased inside the gallery spaces. Sol Lewitt’s art is very process based. He uses a certain algorithmic formula to generate his art and systems to produce it. He deals with lines frequently and the mathematical approach to his design is reflected in the design of the Dowker Pavilion. A study of a precedent museum (the Johnson) is shown below which initiated the pavilion project.

Year: 2011

View Precedent and Concept

View Site and Context

View Program and Circulation

View Internal Experience


Analysis Project

Johnson Museum: Precedent Analysis.

Objective. Analyze the Johnson Museum to use as a precedent study to the Pavilion (shown above).

Method. The Johnson Museum acts like a landmark on the Cornell campus and different layers of analysis were used to examine the museum: namely the views of the building as a landmark, the generation of form in regards to light, and program.

Views from different vantage points on campus were combined to illustrate a fragmented depiction of the facade from different locations on campus. Light penetrating the windows was viewed as a solid slicing through the space and generating the approximate form of the museum. The form is further broken down by the solid and void diagram which illustrates the amount of gallery space within the wireframe of the museum. Then the program diagram begins to tackle who is allowed into the space and the dichotomy between private versus public space.

The final aspect of the analysis dealt with the experience of the user within the space. The levels of visual detail seen in the room are tracked through a panorama showing different levels of concentrated detail. Finally, the movement through the space is tracked with a circulation diagram as well as an interaction diagram illustrating the architectural cues that point the user where to go in the space.

Year: 2011

View Project Design and Details


Charrete Competition

Bus Terminal:

Objective. There was no shelter at the existing bus stop and no direct path or any particular way leading to it. Our goal was to provide a shelter on the existing site, create a space that people look forward to gather while waiting, and to design an architectural construct, or sculpture, that compels one to experience the landscape/site consciously.

Method. Through the creation of the staircase and the construction of the bus shelter, the transition, the object, and the transience of time itself force the pedestrians to consciously experience the site, Libe Slope. We begin to question: What is the boundary of or distinction between field, object, and that which lingers in between?

Year: 2011

View Project Design and Details